Science

Spectacular Harvest Moon appears in October sky for first time since 2009

Spectacular Harvest Moon appears in October sky for first time since 2009

This provides extra light and makes it easier for farmers to see what they are doing while harvesting crops.

Pete Lawrence, The Telegraph's Night Sky columnist, explains: "Normally, the Harvest Moon is September's full Moon".

In addition to appearing an orangish hue as it first rises, the harvest moon tends to bring a succession of brighter nights, as fuller moons rise nearly immediately after the sun sets in the Northern Hemisphere.

It is the name given to the first full moon after the autumn equinox - when the sun shines nearly directly over the equator.

Last year's harvest moon was a supermoon, as the moon was especially close to Earth.

According to Space.com, the term "Harvest Moon" refers to the full moon that falls nearest to the autumnal equinox, which occurred September 22.

Be aware that the moon looks the biggest when it's lowest in the sky, so early in the night is the best time to see it.

This year's Harvest Moon will be at its brightest at around 7.40pm.

While October is usually reserved for the Hunter's Moon, this year, we're getting a late Harvest Moon. The moon gets its name because it rises shortly after sunset.

Sometimes, it is alleged that the moon turns a deep orange for the Harvest Moon.