Worldwide

Bombed Minnesota Mosque Didn't Have Security Cameras

Bombed Minnesota Mosque Didn't Have Security Cameras

While the bombing was "horrific and tragic", Omar told The Associated Press, "on the other hand, good people came out, and they outnumber that one bad guy, and we are so pleased and so happy to see this community coming together in our support".

Mark Dayton called on the community to unite against such attacks.

In the late afternoon of August 5th, the Minnesota chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-MN) offered a $10,000 reward for any information leading to the arrest and conviction of anyone responsible for the attack on the mosque. "And we are hopeful about our neighbors and about the interfaith community that have come forward in a show of support", said Imam Asad Zaman, executive director of the group.

The FBI confirmed the incident was under investigation. The fundraiser states "extensive damage" was done to the imam's office and the water sprinkler system during the bombing.

And while the mosque has received threatening calls and messages, Deputy Bloomington Police Chief Mike Hartley said Sunday he was unaware of any hate crimes reported at the center.

CAIR-MN told TPM by email on Tuesday, "At this point we don't have any indication of any statements or outreach" from the White House.

Would it have killed the president to sneak in a tweet about an "act of terrorism" that occurred over the weekend in Minnesota?

"This is the right spirit and there is no better way to condemn the person who would throw a bomb into this mosque than to react in a loving, kind, inclusive way", Ellison said. That doesn't comport with the president's narrative that all terrorist acts are carried out by Muslims.

Silence after attacks where Muslims are the victims is not uncharacteristic for the president, who has been previously lambasted for a perceived double standard that critics claim he applies when denouncing terrorism. Kellyanne Conway, a counselor to Trump, said in February that the president "doesn't tweet about everything; he doesn't make a comment about everything" when asked about not commenting on the Quebec attack. He estimates the mosque holds up to 300 worshippers for Friday prayers.

Trump's deputy adviser Sebastian Gorka, who reportedly lost his contract with the Federal Bureau of Investigation over his hard-line, often factually incorrect anti-Muslim rhetoric, on Tuesday suggested the attack could be a ruse. Religion being a reason for a hate crime was 16.7 percent in the year 2015, which was the last year there was data. "You have to check them and find out who the perpetrators are".