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17 mummies discovered in central Egypt

17 mummies discovered in central Egypt

The latest find, announced on the weekend by the country's Antiquities Ministry includes at least 17 well-preserved mummies found in a necropolis in the village of Tuna al-Gabal, about 210 kilometres south of the capital, Cairo.

The tomb in 2016 detected by the radar group of students of Cairo University.

It was the second discovery of mummies announced by the ministry in less than a month. Last month, several mummies were uncovered in a nobleman's tomb at Luxor, a city in the ancient Egyptian capital of Thebes where you still can find the Luxor and Karnak temples, as well as two royal tombs: the Valley of the Kings and the Valley of the Queens.

A team from Cairo University followed up with the mission of the new discovery.

The discovery of the mummies is considered unprecedented because it is the first of its kind in that area.

An ancient burial was at a depth of about eight meters under the ground.

The site also contained limestone and clay sarcophagi, animal coffins, and papyrus inscribed with Demotic script.

Egypt's antiquities ministry said the mummies were from the Late Period, which spanned from 664 BC until 332 BC.

Salah al-Kholi, an Egyptology professor who led the mission, said up to 32 mummies could be in the chamber, including mummies of women, children and infants, Reuters reports.

"Such big number of discovered mummies revealed that there will be a large necropolis behind the shafts", the minister added.

"The more we drill the more we find", Egypt's Minister of Antiquities Khaled Anani told reporters Saturday.

"2017 has been a historic year for archaeological discoveries", said Anani.

Cruise jokingly warned Egyptians about the danger of opening sarcophagi, writing in the retweet: "Be careful opening those things".

The discovery comes as Egypt struggles to revive its tourism sector, partially driven by antiquities sightseeing, that was hit hard by political turmoil since the 2011 uprising.

The finding of human necropolis is being heralded as "important" and "unprecedented" archeological discovery for Egypt. However, Islamist militant attacks get in the way.